Advertise
About Us


USA


Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming








Copyright © 2008 - 2014 by Andrew J. Morris





A generation which ignores history has no past -- and no future.

Robert Heinlein

History of Annandale, (Fairfax County) Virginia

Our on-site database does not include an historic photo for Annandale, (Fairfax County) Virginia, do you have one you would like to contribute? Contact Us!


Local History Notes:

Civil War Engagements near Annandale VA

Annandale, VA., Dec. 2, 1861. 45th New York Infantry. At 1 p.m. about 200 Confederate cavalry attacked the several pickets of the 45th N. Y. at a barricade on an unfinished railroad and elsewhere between Annandale Station and the Alexandria and Fairfax Court House Turnpike. No resistance was made, for the reason that the pickets believed the cavalrymen to be United States troops, who usually made their rounds about that time of Day. Gen. Blenker said in his report that, "they were overpowered and had to fall back into the Woods, where, under command of Capt. Weller, they made a stand, firing on the enemy." The Confederates in three detachments passed the barricade, surprised two men of the 32nd N. Y. and made them prisoners, but not before the batteries had fired at them. The enemy then turned and retreated at full speed, again passing the barricade without molestation from the pickets, some of whom they captured. Blenker adds that two companies at Cox's Farm and a small squad of mounted rifles were despatched to the vicinity of the barricade, charged on the Confederates and drove them back toward Centerville, following them 2 Miles. Federal Loss, 1 killed, 14 prisoners; Confederate loss, 3 killed, 2 prisoners.

Annandale, VA., Oct. 18, 1863. Under Date Oct. 19, Maj. Mosby reported to Gen. Stuart that Near Annandale the Day before he had, without loss to his own command, been involved in A Sharp skirmish with double the Number of his own cavalry, in which he had routed the Federals, capturing their captain in command and 6 or 7 men and horses. No Federal report of the affair is to be found.

Annandale, VA., Near, Oct. 22, 1863. A detachment of Col. L. C. Baker's Battalion, First District cavalry, and a detachment of the California Battalion, encountered a squad of Mosby's men near the Little River turnpike, 3 Miles from Fairfax Court House, between that point and Annandale, and killed 1 and captured 3 of them.

Annandale, VA., March 16, 1864. Some cavalry stragglers from Kilpatrick's command were captured by a small band of guerrillas below this town. Two of them guarded by a like Number of guerrillas killed their guards and escaped.

Annandale, VA., Aug. 24, 1864. 26th Michigan Infantry and I6th New York Cavalry. Col. Mosby with about 250 men attacked the stockade at Annandale shortly after 5 a. m. Posting 2 pieces of artillery on the right and left of the road beyond Carbine Range, he sent a flag of truce to demand surrender. Under cover of this flag he advanced his 2 field-pieces to within 400 yards of the stockade, one menacing its southwest, the other at its northwest corner. Surrender was decisively refused. Then a detachment of about 100 of his men charged up toward the entrance of the stockade, but meeting a volley they swerved to the south and were deployed south and east of the stockade. Twice more a surrender was demanded and refused, the last time with the threat from Capt. Mickles, commanding the garrison, that another flag of truce would be fired on. Mosby's artillery firing was so wild that though it was continued over an hour no Federal was wounded. Probably fearing Federal reinforcement, Mosby Sent his field-pieces up the Fairfax Court House Road and his entire force retreated slowly. A sergeant and two men on picket were captured. Confederate loss, 1 killed, 3 wounded.

SOURCE: The Union Army A History of Military Affairs in the Loyal States 1861-65 -- Records of the Regiments in the Union Army -- Cyclopedia of Battles -- Memoirs of Commanders and Soldiers. 8 vols. Madison: Federal Publishing, 1908.








Virginia Facts:
Tree: flowering dogwood
Bird: cardinal
Flower: dogwood
Nickname: Mother of Presidents, The Old Dominion
Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis (Thus Always To Tyrants)
Area (sq. mi.): 40,817
Capitol: Richmond
Admitted: 26 Jun 1788


Mexican Business Directory



Annandale is situated 110 meters above sea level.



Visit supporters of this site at: